FATHER ANDREW WOULD LIKE TO ANSWER THE QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE ABOUT THE SACRAMENT OF THE EUCHARIST, ADORATION AND THE EUCHARISTIC REVIVAL CURRENTLY TAKING PLACE. 

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Questions PREVIOUSLY ANSWERED:

Q: What do I do if I have a gluten sensitivity? 

A: The most recent document in the Catholic Church about how to handle gluten sensitivities teaches that the bread must contain some gluten in order to be valid to use during Mass. There are two options for how to handle a gluten sensitivity. For the first option, a low gluten bread can be used for those who have a gluten intolerance. For the second option, if you have a severe gluten allergy, you can receive just the cup during the reception of Eucharist. The Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ are received fully in the Bread and fully in the Wine, in each species of the Eucharist. Unfortunately, at this time, due to the pandemic, we are not able to offer the cup to the community.

Here at Holy Eucharist, we make every effort to enable each person to receive the Eucharist. If you need special accommodations, please see a sacristan at least 20 minutes before Mass. The sacristan can be found near the Eucharistic Minister signup sheets located outside the Sacristy in the hallway leading to the Daily Chapel. If the sacristan is not there, you can let a Host Minister or Welcome Center Minister know that you need to speak with a sacristan. They will find the sacristan for you. If you are comfortable with receiving a low gluten bread, you will be given a pyx (a small round box) and the package with the bread in it. To avoid contamination, you will open the package and put the low gluten bread into the pyx yourself. Then this pyx will be put into Father Andrew’s ciborium (the low bowl that contains the bread to be consecrated). To receive Communion, you will stand in Father Andrew’s line. When you come up to Father Andrew, you will let Father Andrew know that the pyx is yours and he will hand it to you. You will then open the pyx and consume the consecrated Host. 

For more information about how the Catholic Church handles gluten sensitivities and the Mass check out this link: https://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/the-mass/order-of-mass/liturgy-of-the-eucharist/celiac-disease-and-alcohol-intolerance


Q: Why are we having a Eucharistic Revival?

A: Because the Church needs healing, and the world needs the Church. Scandal, division, disease, doubt. The Church has withstood each of these throughout history. But today we confront all of them, all at once. Our response in this moment is pivotal. In the midst of these roaring waves, Jesus is present, reminding us that he is more powerful than the storm. He desires to heal, renew, and unify the Church and the world. How will he do it? By uniting us once again around the source and summit of our faith—the Holy Eucharist.

*source: https://www.eucharisticrevival.org


Q: What does the word “Eucharist” mean?

A: The term “Eucharist” originates from the Greek word eucharistia, meaning thanksgiving. “And when he had given thanks (Greek: eucharistésas or “eucharisted”), he broke it, and said, ‘This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me’” (1 Cor 11:24).

*source: https://www.usccb.org/eucharist


Q: Is the Eucharist a symbol?

A: No! The transformed bread and wine are truly the Body and Blood of Christ and are not merely symbols. When Christ said “This is my body” and “This is my blood,” He meant it. During Mass, the bread and wine are transubstantiated. What does “transubstantiation” mean? Although the bread and wine appear the same to our human faculties, they are actually the real Body and Blood of Christ.

*source: https://www.usccb.org/eucharist


Q:  What did St. Teresa of Calcutta have to say about the Eucharist?

A: “Jesus has made Himself the Bread of Life to give us life. Night and day, He is there. If you really want to grow in love, come back to the Eucharist, come back to that Adoration.”— St. Teresa of Calcutta

“Known for her heroic works of charity among “the poorest of the poor,” Mother Teresa often remarked that she and her sisters could not carry out their mission without daily, regular Eucharistic adoration.”

*source: Our Sunday Visitor - 11 men and women of the Eucharist